C-POP Notes
Copyright 2001 Camille Pratt

Here are my notes and 'instructions'...if followed, they are literally
fool-proof. ; )  I happen to include coloring in my notes, but you can
obviously remove those steps.

Ooooookay...it went like this(9/9/2001):

Recipe was for 50 ounces of oils, pretty classic recipe, very basic: Castor,
coconut, olive, palm, shea.

Set oven to just below 200*.
Prepare wooden mold by lining with freezer paper.
Melt oils together till just melted.
Mix lye and water.
Add lye solution to oils.
Stirred in a pinch of UM blue.
Brought to trace.
Took out 1 cup for a deeper UM blue to swirl.
Scented base.
Added colored portion.
Poured into lined mold.
Put in oven for 2 hours.

*At 30 to 40 minutes into it, the soap was in full gel to the corners - but
not goopy looking, like it was too hot. Just a nice controlled gel. No
mounding in the center.

*Continued to check at 15 to 20 minute intervals, but there was not
alteration to the look, no foaming at the edges...just soap taking in it's
surroundings, lol.

*At 2 hours, took out of the oven and set mold on table to cool...this takes
some time, since the wood is nice and warm.

*Freezer paper glided right off, no oils or oddities on bottom of soap.

*Cut and tested - wonderful lather, no drying. It is soap.


Observations:

*Temps in oven ranged from 190* to 200*, I have a gas oven.

*Should sit for a week to firm up, but it is almost as firm as DH HP, but
not as soft as CSDBHP or Cpot HP.

*UM was slightly paler, but still intact.

*Scent was not disturbed at all...still quite strong, even at a 1% usage
rate.


Cautions:

*Use only a sturdy wood mold made of *untreated* lumber.
*Be sure to have an oven thermometer on hand (in the oven) to know true oven
temps.
*Invest in a good pair of oven mitts. ; )


Notes(9/9/2001):

I just cut some of it a then cut a sliver off of one bar, and it is soap. No
tingle, smooth as CP. Lathered  very well, no dryness to the back of my
hands.

I was sitting there thinking, the other day about it. Since I know what
temps are in soap when we HP the regular way(200* to 215* F), and since I
know what temps are in soap that is in CP gel (175* to 185* F), it made me
think about the oven thing as a controlled gel AND HP mixed. IF I could
sustain non-damaging temps for at least 2 hours, it could possibly cook
itself through, but without the exothermic action or stirring. At the very
least, it would be fully gelled soap, but still tingle. However, this was
not the case. What I did get was fully cooked soap, with a swirl and
scenting intact.  I would not do this with anything other then the wooden
box mold I did it in.

Is the soap ready to sell tomorrow? No. I would still like to see it firmer
(it was very firm, but I know more water is going to come out and I hate
soap that drops it's drawers <g>). I would also like to still see it cure
for week or two for a milder soap.

What would be the premise for a soap made like this?  Some CP soap with some
cure time removed.


Additional Notes (9/16/2001):

It is ready to be wrapped and sold. : )  Scent is still strong (My usage
rate of quality FOs is 1%). Color is slightly paler then had I just CPed it.
Oh, and I personally would never do this with a milk soap, but then I won't
HP milk soap either, but this is all personal preference. : )

Again:

*Make sure you use a WOOD mold that is of UNTREATED wood (and without a
finish)
*Make sure you KNOW your TRUE oven temps (invest in a modestly priced oven
thermometer)*Be sure to treat yourself to a good pair of oven mitts!!! ; )

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